Fixing the White Sox Part II, Infield and Catchers

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By Soxman

As the White Sox drop two of three to the lowly Royals and lose badly to the Twins, my hands can’t seem to type fast enough in publishing part II of our continuing series “fixing the White Sox” for 2010.

In this series, I’ll take stock of the players who will stay (”put ‘em on the board”) or those who need to move on (”He gone”), and look at possible trades, free agents and minor leaguers that could improve the team.

In our final edition, we’ll look at line-ups and rotations based on our newly found perspectives. Remember, this series is based on some semblance of reality.  For example, Alex Rios is one of our outfielders in 2010.  His contract is large, so his sub-200 batting average since coming to the south side pretty much assures he’ll be in the starting line-up in 2010.

Infield

I honestly don’t expect a lot of movement in our infield in the off-season as it appears as though Gordon Beckham will remain at third base.

Paul Konerko-  Put em on the Board.

As a ten and five player, Konerko has the right to veto any trade.  After an injury riddled 2008 campaign, he bounced back nicely hitting .287, 27 HR, 85 RBI.  He’ll be eligible for free agency after 2010 and the Sox will likely keep him around for his PR value as much as his HR power.  There would not be much of a market for Konerko in the off-season as the Angels, a team who has coveted Paulie in the past, have a fine first baseman in Kendry Morales.

Chris Getz- Put em on the Board

While this would be one spot that the White Sox could add a bat, the free agent market is slim and aside from injury problems, Getz put up a decent rookie campaign, hitting .263 and swiping 25 bases in just 364 ABs.  He needs to work on bunting in winter ball to be a catalyst of Ozzie Ball in 2010.

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Alexei Ramirez- Put em on the Board or He Gone?

If there is anywhere that the Sox could move a player, it would be here.  Ramirez comes cheap as he is under contract for two more seasons at $1 million per season.  Sure, he has hit at least 15 homers and stolen at least 13 bases in his first two seasons, and has made some spectacular plays defensively.  However, his play was lackadaisical in many games during the season and he is yet to add consistent execution to his game, choosing to swing for the fences rather than moving runners over.  He’s the one player who does not exceptionally thrill me.  Still, a power-hitting shortstop with a low price tag could command some top prospects in return.

Gordon Beckham- Put em on the Board

The 2009 AL Rookie of the Year Candidate is here to stay.  While I’d rather see him at shortstop, he will continue to master his craft defensively, develop his power and likely become the biggest stalwart at third base since Robin Ventura.alexeicheshirt1

Jason Nix- Put em on the Board

While his batting average is low and his strikeout rate his high, we should remember that Nix is officially in rookie status.  He is capable of playing any of the infield positions and can man the corners in the outfield.  In just under 250 Abs, he has hit 12 dingers and swiped 10 bases.  The ideal utility player, he should be back with the Sox in 2010.

Catchers

A.J Pierzynski- Put em on the Board

A.J. has been the team’s most consistent hitter all season long and has been one of the more passionate players in a rather lifeless clubhouse.  A free agent after 2010, A.J. knows he’s merely keeping the seat warm for top prospect Tyler Flowers.  Still, it’s safe to pencil AJ in as a starting catcher next season.

Ramon Castro- He Gone

Aside from catching Mark Buehrle’s perfect game, Castro hasn’t done much with the White Sox in 2009.  With AJ starting 75% to 85% of all games, back-up catcher is an area the Sox can trim a little payroll.  Castro made over $1 million this season. There are a host of free agent catchers out there who could act as serviceable back-ups at a much lower price tag.

Tyler Flowers- Put ‘em on the AAA Board

Flowers will benefit from a full season of AAA conditioning as he prepares to take over catching duties in 2011.

So to summarize the 2010 Roster thus far:

Carlos Quentin
Alex Rios (not by choice, by contract)
Scott Podsednik (4th outfielder/Super Sub)
Paul Konerko
Chris Getz
Jayson Nix
Alexei Ramirez (should explore trade market)
Gordon Beckham
A.J. Pierzynski

Na Na Na Hey Hey Hey Hey Goodbye

Jermaine Dye
Mark Kotsay
DeWayne Wise
Ramon Castro

Next edition we’ll look at pitching…then the free agent market.

Fixing the White Sox, part 1: The outfield

Jermaine Dye

By Soxman

Easy Shoeless Joe Jackson fans, you see the title of this column and possibly fret. But don’t worry, Buck Weaver has no reason to turn over in his grave. We are not using the word “fix” as a reference to 1919, unless we are predicting Gordon Beckham’s chances of going 19/19 next year.

So before Josie goes on a vacation far away for the winter, we are turning our collective heads to look at next season. The most optimistic of fans called an official time of death on the flat-lining 2009 season when the Oakland A’s thrashed us September 8th. Even Darin Jackson and Ed Farmer’s in-game discussion turned from post-season to potential in terms of Ozzie Guillen using September to audition players for 2010.

Over the next few weeks, we will be offering our perspectives on “fixing the White Sox” for 2010. We will take stock of the players who will stay (“put em on the board”) or those who need to move on (“He gone”), and look at possible trades, free agents and minor leaguers that could improve the team. In our final edition, we’ll look at line-ups and rotations based on our newly found perspectives.

Let’s play ball! Outfield

Scott PodsednikScott Podsednik (LF, CF)

Put Em on the Board.

Kenny Williams hinted last week that he might not fill the DH spot next season with a traditional slugger. If that’s true, he could re-sign Pods and not promise him a starting gig, but instead rotating him in the outfield and DH where he could easily amass 350 or so ABs. But at age 34 can he repeat the .304, 5 HR, 26 SB, .355 OBP, season he has put together thus far? As he was unemployed before the Sox called this year, there likely isn’t a waiting list for his services.

Mark Kotsay

He Gone.

While Kotsay is well-liked by manager Ozzie Guillen and versatile in his ability to play all outfield positions and first base, he’ll be 35 next season and is in the twilight of his career. At best, he gets invited back to compete for the 5th OF position, which could likely be occupied with a much cheaper alternative. The Sox will look for bargains at back-up positions in order to address emerging needs as a team.

Dewayne Wise

He Gone.

We’ll always love you for the catch that saved Mark Buehrle’s perfect game, but a .207 batting average won’t cut it. You can hate Scotty Pods for taking your job.

Jermaine Dye

He Gone.

It kills me to say it as “JD” is one of my favorites. His bat vanished after the All-Star Break and his defense, while acceptable, has slowed considerably from what it was in 2005. How bad is his offensive decline? He’s batting .151 with one HR and 1 RBI over his last 53 ABs.

Carlos QuentinCarlos Quentin

Put Em on the Board

It what has been another lost season for Quentin, he’s still under the Sox control and is only 28 years old. His 16 HRs in just 289 ABs indicate the power stroke is still there. With 500 ABs and perhaps a little rest in a “fluid” DH spot, Quentin could revisit the 30 HR club.

Alex Rios

Put Em on the Board

I wrote an article indicating while the Alex Rios move was a good one, only Alex Rios Himself can prove me wrong. Starting fresh in 2010, without the pressure of taking fan favorites’ jobs, Rios will be given every opportunity to succeed. The negative indicators? His on-base percentage has dropped at least 20 points every year since 2007 and his slugging percentage has dropped at least 30 points! The Sox are stuck with his contract regardless.

NEXT WEEK: Catchers and Infielders