Turner Broadcasting Systems Purchases Bleacher Report

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The largest independent sports media website is no longer independent.  Bleacher Report officially announced today that it has been acquired by Turner Broadcasting Systems for a rumored price tag of $180 million dollars, although some reports place the number higher.

A ton of business-minded websites are covering this story but very few sports websites are considering the impact this will have on independent online sports media.

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Sorting out the Ryan Braun Fiasco; Who were the winners and the losers?

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unlike most of the sports media world, I thought I would sit back and soak up the details before discussing my opinion on the scandal/drug testing fiasco involving the reigning National League MVP and Milwaukee Brewers outfielder Ryan Braun.

Thus far, we’ve heard the results of the appeal, some details involving the test, Braun’s comments and the MLB’s irate feelings on the entire situation.

A lot of questions still linger around Braun’s successful appeal, so let’s take a look at where we are now from three different perspectives; Braun himself, Major League Baseball and the Media. [Read more…]

Favre, Peyton bring Midwest Sports into National Focus Part 2

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By Paul M. Banks

Brett Favre’s incessant media circus and Peyton Manning’s undefeated Colts have put national spotlight on the Midwest, I discuss this and the future of sports media with Midwest Sports Fans.com’s Jerod Morris.

(PMB) What do you think about this whole movement towards niche specialization?…MLB Network, NBA TV, ESPN Chicago, ESPN Dallas, ESPN Boston (even though regular ESPN is already fixated on Boston) and then on the internet too with fan-centric sites within multi-layered networks like True Hoop, SB Nation etc.

Big Ten Network host/bikini model Melanie Collins

Big Ten Network host/bikini model Melanie Collins

(JM) I love the specialization. I don’t know that I’m a big fan of ESPN’s local sites — there’s still just something about reading Chicago news from the Tribune or Sun-Times that doesn’t translate to the faceless pages of ESPN.com – but I love knowing that there is a place I can go that is devoted to the Big Ten, and then another place devoted to MLB, and so on.

ESPN gives us the cliff’s notes version of sports. Networks like the Big Ten Network and MLB Network, and websites for particular leagues and teams, give us the entire book. Sometimes you want the summary and sometimes you want to read the book. Now sports fans have the option to choose whatever they wish.

This is good; again, it comes down to who is the most forward-thinking from a business standpoint and can monetize what is, overall, a better (though more fragmented in ownership) product for consumers.

One advantage that local papers and news stations always had over the ESPNs of the world was their ability to cover the local beat with more depth, wisdom, and experience. Now that ESPN has launched ESPNChicago, ESPNBoston, ESPNDallas, and then the next 755 of them that they are planning after that, for the first time we are seeing a national sports media outlet really be able to compete for the eyeballs looking for a perspective that is grounded in local history and tradition.

(PMB) Well, it will certainly be interesting to see how it all plays out. As long as guys like you and me get our piece, I’m fine with whatever. After the whole Favre soap opera, what do you think the next big Midwestern sports story will be to take over the national consciousness?

(JM) The re-emergence of Indiana basketball to a national powerhouse in Tom Crean’s second season.

Damn, I couldn’t even type that with a straight face…although I do think the Hoosiers can be a .500 team this year and I think Crean is the right guy at the right time for the job.

No, the next big Midwest sports story has to be Peyton Manning’s continued greatness. Certainly if the Colts stay undefeated it is a story that will dominate everything. But even when they ultimately lose a game or two, this is a team that has to be considered a Super Bowl favorite for one reason and one reason only: Peyton.

Growing up I used to listen to my Dad tell me about Mickey Mantle and Willie Mays and Bill Russell and his favorite football player, Archie Manning. Someday, we’ll all be telling our kids about Michael Jordan and Albert Pujols and Peyton Manning.peytoneli

Hey, look at that. I just named off the three guys that many sports fans of our generation will look back on someday as the best of the best. And what cities did they play in? Chicago, St. Louis, and Indianapolis.

See, it all comes back to the Midwest.

(PMB) Where I’m based, Chicago is a good place to start looking for that next big thing, but there are two main obstacles in the way.

1.) We haven’t had a real winner in our history other than MJ and the Bulls.

2.) The people here are psychotically obsessed with two teams that overshadow everyone, the Bears and Cubs. They also happen to be two teams horribly mismanaged at all levels of the organization. Both clubs also treat both the media and their fans like subhuman trash. Your thoughts?

(JM) I think the city of Chicago has wasted its collective energy on the Cubs for more than a century. Sadly, I don’t see it changing, neither the city’s incongruous obsession with the “lovable losers” nor their lovable losing.

As for the Bears, their lack of success should not be surprising. If we’ve learned anything over 40 years of NFL football it is that stability at the top of an organization and in the head coach/QB relationship breeds winning. One-year wonders can emerge (like the Bears’ recent Super Bowl participant) but they won’t be built to last.

For a prime example of how to build a consistent winner, shoot down I-65 to Indy. They’ve got the blueprint…you just need to find a Peyton Manning.CT 00294379E_Sox0628_23.JPG

The city of Chicago has long baffled me. I think I am a White Sox fan in part because of my contrarian nature. All of my friends growing up were Cubs fans and I couldn’t understand it. What has this team done to deserve such adoration? It is immensely fitting and appropriate to me that the White Sox were the team to finally break the city’s baseball curse.

Unfortunately for Chicago football fans, there is no alternative to the Bears.

(PMB) Couldn’t have said it any better myself, about both of Chicago’s lovable losers. I think you might have articulated why I’m a White Sox fan as well.

Readers, be sure to check out Midwest Sports Fans.com early and often!